Performance Program A

Program A

Shell Game
Martyn Coutts (VIC)
Shell Game is a personal model for divination about the future. Placing you into the centre of the Spratly Islands, an international flashpoint where international shipping, mango exports and the odd K-Pop star have been caught up in the maelstrom.
Is this for me? For those who seek safety and surety in an uncertain world.

The Ride
Cigdem Aydemir (NSW)
Take a backseat ride through the Australian landscape as you become an extra on a film set. The Ride casts a cynical eye over the war on terror, subverting the power of the patriarchy in a playfully deviant way.
Is this for me? For those not afraid to role play in front of the camera.

Tresse // Passing – Don’t Touch My Hair
Hannah Bronte (QLD)
Relax into this sonic encounter braiding political, poetic and power laden rap. Tresse // Passing is a personal narrative exploring culture down to the root. The Blak Matriarchy is alive and well.
Is this for me? A raw, multi-sensory environment. Contains some coarse language.

All Proximity Festival performances take place during the day in Perth’s inner city precinct Cathedral Square.
Select from Program A, B, C or book to see all nine performances.

Proximity Performances
Tue 26 Sep- Sat 7 Oct (no performances Sun or Mon)
Sessions: 11:45am | 1:00pm | 2.30pm
Duration: 70 minutes no interval, includes briefing session
Tickets: $45 per program | $135 Marathon all programs
Location: Performances are across multiple venues within the Cathedral Square precinct. Performances starts at the Perth Town Hall, Cnr Barrack & Hay St, Perth.

Tickets limited, booking fees apply

Conditions of entry to Proximity Festival:
Ticket holders must arrive 5 minutes prior to the performance start time. Late entry will not be admitted. Proximity is an 18+ event. Please wear enclosed shoes. If you have access needs, please call us to book. Proximity Festival reserves the right to stop performances at anytime for the health and safety of both artist and audience member.

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Cigdem Aydemir, Whirl, 2015, Photo: Meg White